Quality control genotyping for assessment of genetic identity and purity in diverse tropical maize inbred lines

Posted by Carelia Juarez on , in Journal Articles

Published in Theoretical and Applied Genetics, 2012

Kassa Semagn, Yoseph Beyene, Dan Makumbi, Stephen Mugo, B. M. Prasanna, Cosmos Magorokosho and Gary Atlin

Quality control (QC) genotyping is an important component in breeding, but to our knowledge there are not well established protocols for its implementation in practical breeding programs. The objectives of our study were to (a) ascertain genetic identity among 2–4 seed sources of the same inbred line, (b) evaluate the extent of genetic homogeneity within inbred lines, and (c) identify a subset of highly informative single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers for routine and low-cost QC genotyping  and suggest guidelines for data interpretation. We used a total of 28 maize inbred lines to study genetic identity among different seed sources by genotyping them with 532 and 1,065 SNPs using the KASPar and GoldenGate platforms, respectively. An additional set of 544 inbred lines was used for studying genetic homogeneity. The proportion of alleles that differed between seed sources of the same inbred line varied from 0.1 to 42.3 %. Seed sources exhibiting high levels of genetic distance are mis-labeled, while those with lower levels of difference are contaminated or still segregating. Genetic homogeneity varied from 68.7 to 100 % with 71.3 % of the inbred lines considered to be homogenous. Based on the data sets obtained for a wide range of sample  sizes and diverse genetic backgrounds, we recommended a subset of 50–100 SNPs for routine and low-cost QC genotyping, verified them in a different set of double haploid and inbred lines, and outlined a protocol that could be used to minimize errors  in genetic analyses and breeding.

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